AMD FreeSync Technology Review

👤by Tim Harmer Comments 📅19-03-15
FreeSync Compatible Monitors

All monitors which claim FreeSync compatible have been validated by AMD as such, although AMD holding the validation criteria, (which includes the minimum acceptable refresh rate range) under NDA. Others such as the 120Hz 27 Asus MG279Q also feature Adaptive Sync support and so should be FreeSync compatible, but wont necessarily meet AMDs own minimum standards and hence it being being a FreeSync monitor is open to interpretation. Here are a selection of monitors launching with FreeSync support:

ACER XG270HU



Panel Type: 27 TN Panel
Resolution: 2560x1440 (1440p, 16:9)
Dynamic Refresh Rate Range: 40-144Hz
Price: $499 USD (MSRP)


BenQ XL2730Z



Panel Type: 27 TN Panel
Resolution: 2560x1440 (1440p, 16:9)
Dynamic Refresh Rate Range: 40-144Hz
Price: $599 USD (MSRP)


LG 34UM67



Panel Type: 34 IPS Panel
Resolution: 2560x1080 (Ultrawide 21:9)
Dynamic Refresh Rate Range: 48-75Hz
Price: $649 USD (MSRP)


LG 29UM67

Panel Type: 29 IPS Panel
Resolution: 2560x1080 (Ultrawide 21:9)
Dynamic Refresh Rate Range: 48-75Hz
Price: $449 USD (MSRP)



A summary of FreeSync monitors announced and coming soon.


Although only eight models are summarised above AMD claims that eleven are currently in production. They run the gamut of resolutions, from 1080p all the way to 4K including non-standard formats, with the only thing in common being support for FreeSync and a DisplayPort interface.

AMD obviously gained much from the monitor market currently transitioning to higher resolutions and monitor sizes, with all manufacturers attempting to provide 1440p and 4K solutions that offer a great experience. Mainstream graphics are also finally able to achieve these higher resolutions at relevant image quality settings, reducing the overall cost of an acceptable high resolution gaming configuration. By seizing the mood of the market AMD and their partners have the chance to capitalise just as thoughts move to Windows 10 and broad system upgrades.

One area of potential concern however is pricing. Monitors currently listed with pricing information are typically in the $400-$600 range as they tend to be high-end 27 144Hz panels, and whilst 1080p monitors are being launched we dont yet know their cost. At least one relatively low-cost 24 1080p panel which supports FreeSync is probably essential for the technology to reach the notoriously frugal mass gaming market.

With few comparable G-SYNC designs its difficult to gauge savings for FreeSync over G-SYNC, but we should mention that the ACER XG270HU is approximately 200 cheaper than the similarly 1440p 144Hz ASUS PG278Q ROG SWIFT. Similarly its possible to purchase 1440p FreeSync monitors for less than the price of 1080p G-SYNC designs in the same size range. However the underlying technologies and capabilities in each panel (with the exception of some form of frame syncing tech) differ wildly.



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