Netgear Nighthawk Pro Gaming XR500 Review

👤by Matthew Hodgson Comments 📅10-08-18
Closer Look
The Netgear Nighthawk XR500 gaming router is certainly on the larger side, when considering you’ll also require a modem of some kind from your ISP, measuring in at 320mm wide, 250mm deep and 55mm tall; you’d assume the device would be heavy too, due to the size, but it doesn’t even get close to a kilogram, tipping the scales at 801g without any power adaptors or cables attached.

The entire enclosure is made from matt plastic with a, sadly, cheap and inexpensive feel; we’d expect something a little more premium for the £250, perhaps even a metal enclosure that could work to dissipate the heat that will inevitably be generated by the dual core CPU inside. While the XR500 might look the part, unfortunately it doesn’t feel it.



The front of the XR500 houses a total of 11 white indicator LEDs, flanked by imitation cooling vents for that sporty, alien-ship style. As you can see from this angle, the antennas make up a vast portion of the overall size, accounting for the empty space required.



On the rear, starting from the left, there’s an LED toggle switch; this switch disables the front lighting so it can be used under the TV without becoming annoying, for instance. Next along is a recessed Reset switch. We then have an antenna connection and four Gigabit RJ45 ethernet connections. The fifth yellow port is then to connect your router and ISPs model. Moving right, there’s a second antenna connection, then a power port and power on/off switch.




On top of the router, towards the front for easy access, is a WiFi toggle switch – handy if your children spend too much time absorbed by their mobile devices or if you’re concerned about Wireless internet safety. There’s a WPS button alongside this, dangerously close to the WiFi toggle, but this enables trouble-free connection of devices that support the WPS standard.

The front LEDs are clearly labelled in this image, indicating which ports and networks are active. They can be made to flash to indicate activity or set to a solid LED within the DumaOS software. Or switched off entirely with the toggle switch on the rear.



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